About the Author

Marc Gunther

Marc Gunther

Reporter

A veteran journalist, Marc Gunther has focused much of his reporting and writing throughout his career on the intersection of business and sustainability. He focuses on this connection because of his belief that companies that make the world a better place—by serving their customers, their workers and their communities—will deliver superior results to their owners in the long run.

Marc is editor-at-large of Guardian Sustainable Business and has written for Fortune magazine, in addition to his contributions to B Magazine. Before joining Fortune in 1996, Marc worked for more than 20 years for newspapers including The Paterson (N.J.) News, The Hartford Courant, The Detroit News and The Detroit Free Press.

He is the author or co-author of four other books: Basepaths: From the Minor Leagues to the Majors and Beyond (Scribners, 1984); Monday Night Mayhem: The Inside Story of Monday Night Football (William Morrow, 1988) with Bill Carter; The House That Roone Built: The Inside Story of ABC News (Little Brown, 1994); and Suck It Up: How Capturing Carbon from the Air Can Help Solve the Climate Crisis (Amazon, 2012), a Kindle Single ebook. Monday Night Mayhem became a TV movie shown on TNT, starring John Turturro as Howard Cosell.

Marc has contributed to The New York Times, The Washington Post and Slate, among other publications. He has appeared on NBC, ABC, PBS, CNN and NPR. Marc has appeared before corporate audiences and at numerous conferences as both a moderator and a speaker. He is the creator and co-chair of Brainstorm Green, Fortune’s annual conference on business and the environment.

Marc serves on the board of Net Impact, a organization whose mission is to inspire, educate and equip people to use the power of business to create a more socially and environmentally sustainable world.

Marc has a B.A. from Yale. He grew up in Croton-on-Hudson, New York, and now lives in Bethesda, Maryland, with his wife, Karen Schneider, a vice president at the National Women’s Law Center. They have two grown daughters, Sarah, who is associate director for programs at the Astraea Lesbian Foundation for Justice, and Rebecca, an elementary school teacher in Brooklyn, New York.

Marc also spends a good amount of time reading, hiking, skiing and running marathons, of which he has completed 22 to date.

Learn more about Marc on LinkedIn, or contact him on Twitter: @MarcGunther.

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Articles by Marc Gunther

Will Wall Street Embrace B Corps?

Certifications

Will Wall Street Embrace B Corps?

Etsy set a new standard for ethical business, but after it went public, the markets struggled to figure out what it was worth. And, after Laureate announced an IPO in February, the first public B Corp that is also a benefit corporation was officially up for trading. How will the

Brewing Success (The Fun Way)

Food

Brewing Success (The Fun Way)

Sustainable brewery New Belgium is a seriously fun place to work. Employees own the company through its ESOP structure, are rewarded for their work with vacations, and practice environmental advocacy on a daily basis.

The Patagonia Adventure: $20 Million & Change

Money

The Patagonia Adventure: $20 Million & Change

Patagonia launched $20 Million & Change, a venture capital fund, in 2016 to support companies that aim to do environmental and social good. Patagonia CEO Rose Marcario and overseer of the fund, Phil Graves, explain the socially responsible investments Patagonia is looking to make.

Patagonia Invests: $20 Million & Change

Investing

Patagonia Invests: $20 Million & Change

Patagonia launched $20 Million & Change, a venture capital fund, in 2016 to support companies that aim to do environmental and social good. Patagonia CEO Rose Marcario and overseer of the fund, Phil Graves, explain the socially responsible investments Patagonia is looking to make.

Yvon Chouinard and Patagonia: A 60-Year Timeline

Clothing

Yvon Chouinard and Patagonia: A 60-Year Timeline

Inspirational business leader Yvon Chouinard created his first climbing tools in 1957 as part of his fascination with how things work. He and his wife went on to found one of the most disruptive and innovative consumer-product companies of all time: Patagonia. Here’s how it all happened.

This article originally appeared